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Writing Prompt #82

Writing Prompt #82

Run

Your best friend takes you to a warehouse.  They hand you a gun and tell you to stand guard.  Ten minutes later, you hear a crash and your friend rushes out to tell you to run.  When you finally stop running, your friend is nowhere in sight.

Happy Wednesday!  Have a little drama for your writing prompt today.  I love a high octane action adventure.  Take some time to explore what these two characters are doing at this warehouse.  What are they looking for and does the lookout character even know what’s going on?  Is this a common occurrence for the two?  Talk about what the crash sound was and why they are running.  Is it a monster?  Some guards?  Other theives?  What happens to the other friend?  Why do they disappear?  What sort of adventure does this one crazy night spur?  That’s up to you to decide.

If a high octane heist gone wrong isn’t what you’re looking for try looking through some of my previous writing prompts in the archives.  There’s something there for just about every situation, from romance to fantasy and  horror to feel good fluff.  Remember, everything you write belongs to solely to you.  There’s no need credit me for the initial writing prompt.  However, if you would like to share it with me, I’d love to read it.  Drop a link to it below in the comments or send it to me via social media.

Do you enjoy my writing prompt or other writing-related content?  If so, please consider buying me a coffee!  It’s quick, safe, and will help me save up for a premium Scribophile account.

Writing Prompt #81

Writing Prompt #81

Skateboard for the Elderly

“Grandma stole my skateboard again and refuses to give it back.  Says she’s gotta perfect her kickflip.”

Your writing prompt for this Friday afternoon dips into the humorous side of things.  I can’t remember how I originally got the idea for this one.  Heaven knows that my grandmother probably never even looked at a skateboard.  Then again, neither did I.  I find the image of an elderly lady on a board with death wheels, risking life and hip, to be a bit funny though.  Who knows; I could be wrong.  Maybe your grandmother is a former X Games skater or pioneered women in the skateboarding world.  Perhaps they taught Tony Hawk to skate.  I don’t know but take this prompt and run with it.  See where it takes you.

Grannies on skateboards not your cup of tea?  Peruse through some of my other writing prompts here in the archive.  There’s a little bit of something for every writing need.  Remember!  Anything you write belongs to you, one hundred percent with absolutely no need to credit me for the original prompt.  However, if you’d like to share your writing with me then I’d love to see some of it.  You can either drop me a link in the comments below or connect with me on social media!

Hi there!  Do you enjoy my writing prompt or other writing-related content?  If so, please consider buying me a coffee!  It’s quick, safe, and will help me save up for a premium Scribophile account.  I’ll even customize a writing prompt just for you!

Writing Prompt #80

Writing Prompt #80

Shadowed Beast

Out of the mists and shadows, the beasts rose up out of the darkness.  Taller than anything they’d ever seen and more dangerous too.

For today’s prompt, I went with something a little more ominous.  What makes a beast dangerous?  Why would anyone go looking for a beast so terrible?  Take a moment and think about this.  Describe the characters who go looking for this shadowed beast.  Maybe you’re writing an adventure story and this beast is the end of a long quest.  Or perhaps your characters are meeting this dangerous shadowed beast at the beginning of your story.  However, whatever route you choose to go, tell the story of why they’re looking for it.

Not feeling beasts today?  Browse through my archives for more writing prompts like this one!  Remember, anything you write belongs solely to you with no need to credit me for the prompt.  If you would like to share your writing with me though, I’d love to see it!  Drop a link to your writing in the comments below or connect with me on social media.

Hi there!  Do you enjoy my writing prompt or other writing-related content?  If so, please consider buying me a coffee!  It’s quick, safe, and will help me save up for a premium Scribophile account.  I’ll even customize a writing prompt just for you!

Writing Prompt #79

Writing Prompt #79

Warrior Maiden

She looked more like the kind of girl that was supposed to be protected.  Delicate features with a gentle smile.  Yet she stood there, holding a shield, preparing for battle.

Your prompt this morning happens to be one that I’ve used myself.  So often, many writers feel that the only way to write a “good” female character is to make them the proverbial badass.  However, is that truly what makes a female character interesting?  In order to be considered a strong female lead does a warrior maiden truly have to be this loud, tough, and standalone fighter?  The short answer is no.  Writers should play around with different types of characters regardless of gender, orientation, race, or physicality.  Your challenge today is to write about a girl or woman who doesn’t fit the traditional role of a warrior.  How can a quiet, soft-spoken noble born lady take up the mantle of defender of her people?  What does it look like when gentle farm girl with a kind smile and soft touch bears a shield at the front of a battle?  Tell their stories!

This prompt not what you’re looking for?   Check out my archives for some more writing prompts to kickstart your writing today.  Don’t forget that everything you write based on any of my prompts is one hundred percent yours.  You don’t need to credit me but I’d love to see whatever it is you’ve written.  Drop me a link to it in the comments below or connect with me over social media.

If you enjoy my writing prompts and other articles, please consider buying me a coffee.  It’s quick, safe, and will help me feed my need for tea while writing.  I’ll even customize a writing prompt just for you!

 

Critique Process: the Road to Publishing

If I’m being completely honest, I’m the worst kind of writer there is.  I write and write and write.  Then when I finally get to the end of the first draft, I just stop.  My draft sits in a folder on my computer and accumulates a thick layer of cyber dust so to speak.  When I think about getting the critique process started and editing my work, my fingers freeze on the keyboard.  Unable to move and usually leads me to exit out of Scrivener where my writing stays buried for at least another year before I open it again.  So why is it so hard for me to take the next step from the first draft to the second draft?  Recently, I slogged my way through some very pitiful edits and posted my pseudo-second draft to the critique website, Scribophile.  Here’s what I found out in the first foray into the next step in publishing my writing.

I have a better idea of where to start editing!

Firstly, I had no idea where to start the editing process.  I mean, I thought I did.  Reading through my novel in progress helped initially.  I picked out the glaringly large problems in the writing to attend to.  Plot holes and threads that direly needed attending to were easy enough to catch on my initial read through.  However, what I didn’t really know was where I should start.  When you have 100,000 words plus that need to be reworked, it’s overwhelming, to say the least.  The critique process really helped in that regard.  By having a handful of other people look through my writing, it gave me a better handle on what I needed to focus on.  It showed me what readers were tripping on while reading my work.  With the focused critique I received from my readers on Scribophile, I feel like I have a better understanding of where my first edits need to be.

The critique process actually motivates me more!

Photo by Berkay Gumustekin on Unsplash

I think almost any writer enjoys a pat on the back.  That “good boy” and “atta girl” from another person feels fantastic.  If I’m honest with myself, that’s what I love the most about writing fanfiction.  I’m like a dog.  Tell me I’m a good writer and watch me wag my fluffy little tail.  Compliments, unfortunately, don’t help a writer become a better writer.  In fact, the more compliments I get, the less likely I’m going to be to seriously edit my work.  I know that my work isn’t perfect in its word vomit first draft stage.  I’m not that naive or arrogant.  What it really is there doesn’t feel like a real push to improve my writing.  This then leads to my utter embarrassment a few months down the road when I look at my work again.  A critique, though, feels more like an invested reader telling me that while my writing is good, it could be better with some more time and energy.  This is the gentle reminder that I need to keep going past that first draft stage.

Not all critiques are considered equal.

Obviously, I didn’t expect all who read my writing to instantly love it.  That’s not the point of the critique process.  See the above point.  What I did somewhat expect was that the critique I did get would be in depth, somewhat lengthy, and insightful.  However, what I consider in depth, lengthy, and insightful doesn’t always match up with the readers who chose to critique my work.  Now, I don’t want to sound ungrateful for the feedback I received.  That’s very far from the truth.  All the readers who took time to look through my writing were fantastic and brought up some really good points that I definitely intend on improving upon.   Some of the critiques I received, though, were rather short and focused on things that I specifically asked not to be commented on as it wasn’t what I was primarily worried about.  With that being said, I found that it’s important to think about the feedback you do get.

The people who leave it are trying to be helpful and genuinely want to help you improve your work.

Not all feedback needs to implemented in your draft!

With the above point being said, I found it important to remind myself that not every little fix that my critiquers gave me needed to be added to my draft.  Again, most of the critique I received was given in good faith and intended to help me. However, not all of it fits with the vision I have for the story as a whole.  There are lines of dialogue, specific points of views, and other details that I wrote for a specific reason.   I’m very attached to them.  This isn’t to say, though, that the concerns the critiquers brought up were invalid.  It simply made me realize that I needed to tweak some things to solve problems that my beloved bits and pieces caused.  If I implemented every feedback that I received during the critique process, I would probably end up with something I wasn’t entirely happy with.  I think I’d spend a lot of time wishing I’d kept that one line of dialogue or something of the like.

Final Thoughts

I have a better idea of where to start editing my work.  Without the critique I received from my readers on Scribophile, I’d probably still be completely lost and stuck at the starting line.  I have more confidence and a sense of direction.  I’m excited to start editing and see what other critiquers have to say about future drafts.  Who knows.  Maybe I’ll be ready to publish in some capacity by the end of the year!

How about everyone else?  Where are you on your writer’s journey?  I’d love to hear about it!  Drop me a line here in the comments or connect with me on my Tumblr.  You can also find me here on Scribophile.  Be aware though.  You will need to make an account in order to read, critique, or follow writers.

Need a kickstarter to your creativity or your next writing project?   Check out my collection of writing prompts.

Want to show some appreciation for my prompts and articles in a monetary sense?  Consider donating to me for the price of a single hot beverage!  I’ll customize a prompt just for you!

 

Writing Prompt #78

Writing Prompt #78

Flirty Merman

Her day had been way too long to have to deal with a merman hitting on her.

Your last prompt for the week is a bit of a fun one.  I always see prompts about mermaids but very few about mermen.  I believe somewhere in the wide world of the internet, I’ve read that most of the early depictions of mermen were rather ugly.  However, many modern adaptations that I’ve seen make mermen just as handsome as their female equivalents.  Stories with mermen at the center of them are still in short supply though.  Use this prompt to inspire your next story.  Is your merman the kind of creature that would drag an unsuspecting sailor to their doom?  What are his motives?  How did your heroine even come to be in a position to gain the attention of this flirty merman? Maybe your heroine’s long day began with falling off a ship at sea.  Perhaps she just finished up a terrible date.

Mermen not really your cup of tea?  Check out some of my other writing prompts in the archive for more ideas to give your writing a kickstart.  As always, anything you write belongs solely to you.  You don’t need to credit anyone.  However, if you want to share your writing with me I’d love to read it.  Put a link to it in the comments below or connect with me on Tumblr.

If you enjoy my writing prompts and other articles, please consider buying me a coffee.  It’s quick, safe, and will help me feed my need for tea while writing.  I’ll even customize a writing prompt just for you!

Writing Prompt #77

Writing Prompt #77

The White Funeral Dress

She was the only one wearing white at the funeral.

Today’s writing prompt feels a bit ominous, bordering on the paranormal.    Usually, when I make my writing prompts, the picture that I use as a background for the prompt and the picture that initially inspires the prompt are completely different.  For this prompt, though, I couldn’t find a picture that worked as well as this one.  The way the people in the background seem to ignore the woman in the foreground and her fuzziness almost make it seem that she’s not really visible to anyone but the person holding the camera.  She smiles knowingly as if she has a secret.  Write that secret.  Tell us how she died.  Show us why she’s smiling at her own funeral.  Or take a completely different spin on this prompt.  Maybe she’s the wife or daughter of the deceased.  But why is she wearing white when everyone else wears black?

Spooky and paranormal not really what you’re looking for today?  Browse through my writing prompt archives for dozens of other prompts.  Remember!  Anything you write belongs solely to you with no need to credit.    However, if you want to share your writing with me I’d love to read it.  Drop me a link to your work in the comments below or send it to me via Tumblr.

Want to support my writing?  Consider donating to me for the price of a cup of coffee.  I’ll customize a prompt just for you.

Writing Prompt #76

Writing Prompt #76

New Apartment

Fluffy really enjoyed the view from their new apartment.  Then again, watching Jupiter rise and starships passing right outside the window was pretty impressive.

After a brief break, I’m back with a new set of writing prompts!  This Monday’s prompt is hard and fast science fiction.  I grew up watching movies such as Zenon, Girl of the 21st Century and Star Wars.  Two very different kinds of sci-fi movies but pretty hard and fast examples.  For a large part of my childhood, life on a space station or ship fascinated me.  The mysteries of space are vast and exciting.  With the wide majority of space unexplored, it’s a writer’s paradise and a galaxy of possibilities exists.

Science fiction not really your cup of tea or don’t feel like writing about space station life?  Check out some of my other writing prompts in the archives.  Remember!  Anything you write belongs solely to you with no credit necessary.  However, if you want to share your writing with me I’d love to see it.  Drop a link to it here in the comments or connect with me on Tumblr.

Interested in supporting me?  Consider donating to me for the price of a cup of coffee.  I’ll customize a prompt just for you.

Writing Resource Websites: Happy Birthday from Me to You

It’s January 13th!  Today I turn 27!  Do I feel any more like an adult?  No… not really.  Do I feel old?  Oh boy!  Do I ever!  That’s a discussion for another day though.  In honor of my birthday, I’d like to share some of my favorite writing resource websites.  Sort of like my happy birthday gift from me to you.

Writing Resource Websites

Communities

  • NaNoWriMo: I really enjoy NaNo.  It’s a marathon writing sprint through the month of November and has a fantastic community.  That community is most active during November.  However, a few stalwart people stick around through the entire year.  I like poking around whenever I need some advice and motivation to keep writing.  I did a post in the past about NaNo.  Check it out for more information!
  • Write Tribe: This is a nice facebook group to chat with other writers and make some writer friends.  If you have a question there are over a thousand writers to pick the brain of.  The admin also posts motivational quotes, writing prompts, and discussion starters for the community as a whole.
  • Scribophile: I’ve not had a chance to really try this community out but it’s been on my radar for a few years.  It’s been a NaNoWriMo sponsor for at least two years now and I hold a high amount of trust in NaNo sponsors.  Scribophile offers critiques from the writers in the community and allows writers to post their own works for critique.  There forums, groups, and contests as well.  The site offers a free service and paid service but the free service looks as though it’s not too terribly limited.  I personally can’t wait to check it out further.

Writing Advice

  • Thewritelife.com: I absolutely love, love, love this website.  It hosts articles detailing a whole array of writing topics.  Freelancing, marketing, and publishing are just a handful of things that you’ll find resources on.  They’re all written by experienced writers, authors, and bloggers who’ve been writing for awhile.  If you’ve never been, please be sure to check it out.  It’s at the top of my list to peruse whenever I have a question.
  • Well-storied.com: I’ve been following this blogger for a few years now.  I’ve always enjoyed her posts everything writer-ly related.  There are topics that range from writing craft to publishing to Scrivener tutorials. Definitely worth the quick check out.  If you really enjoy the writing resources on this website then you might also want to check out the facebook community set up for well-storied.com as well.
  • Bryndonovan.com: If you’re a fan of writing masterlists, this is a fantastic resource for you!  In fact, this happens to be one of my favorite writing resource websites.  There are some fantastic posts about writing certain kinds of characters, plot twists, conflicts, and “description thesauruses.”  Ever struggled with how to describe facial expressions or needed a gesture to round out your scene.  I totally have!  I usually pop over into these masterlists whenever I need some suggestions.

Writing Prompts

  • Thefakeredhead.com: I keep a Pinterest board with nothing but writing prompts on it.  Most of the prompts on that board come from this website.  They range from really silly to very serious.  I also love how versatile they are since I can see them being used in so many different contexts.  Also, these prompts are some of the most creative I’ve ever seen.
  • Promptuarium: This particular website has probably one of the biggest archives of writing prompts I’ve ever seen.  Need a paranormal prompt?  This site has you covered!  What about a fluffy romantic prompt?  Yep!  It’s got them too.  The site also features dialogue prompts and character banks if you need some inspiration in that department.
  • Writeroftheprompts: This is a fairly active Tumblr blog full of prompts, advice, quotes, and character banks.  I have so many prompts saved from this blog it’s not even funny.  Some of my favorite prompts that are featured on this blog are called “Kill the Cliche.”  It takes the usual tropes, stereotypes, and plot devices found in many stories and gives writers a specific challenge to turn them on their heads.  I’d personally love to read some stories written from these prompts!

Tumblr Blogs

  • Writing with Color: I follow a lot of Tumblr blogs about writing.  So, so many… However, when I think about my favorite writing resource websites, Writing with Color jumps to my mind pretty quickly.  Especially when I need help with writing about cultures, ethnicities, and races.  It is run by several mods who have very different backgrounds that offer answers to questions, tips on writing diversity in stories, and how to avoid harmful stereotypes.  I spent a lot of time there when working on character building for one of my stories.  Hands down one of the most useful resources on the internet!
  • Brynwrites: Honestly, I love this blog.  I love its moderator.  They go beyond and above when trying to help.  They post advice on a wide variety of writing topics and invite questions from other writers.  Not only are they super eager to give advice but they are incredibly friendly as well.  There must be hundreds of posts worth of writing advice on their blog.  Hundreds of posts that are incredibly well organized.  I’m still in awe over that.  They are fairly active in the Writeblr community and are widely respected for their knowledge and advice.  This is a blog that warrants a follow.
  • Just a Writing Aid: This definitely not just another writing aid!  The moderator of this blog answers questions for just about anything writing related.  Between Brynwrites and Just a Writing Aid, I think most of the posts I reblog come from these two blogs.  Just a Writing Aid compiles their posts in masterlists for easy navigation and reading.  They answer questions daily and are frequent posters in the writing advice tag and Writeblr community.

Final Words

Here you go!  Twelve writing resource websites!  Again, happy birthday from me to you.  One day I’ll have to make another post specifically about Tumblr blogs I think.  Narrowing them down to only a handful was incredibly difficult for me.  Actually, there are many more resources that I didn’t get to but are phenomenal as well.  I might have to do another similar post sometime in the future but that’s thought for another day.

If you happen to have any writing resource websites that I didn’t mention but think I should check out, please leave a comment below or send it to me via social media!  I’d love to check it out and see what else is out there.

If you enjoy my posts, prompts, and advice, please consider donating!  It only costs the price of a hot beverage and I’ll throw in a cool customized writing prompt just for you.  Every little bit helps me continue creating and writing so I can bring you, even more, writing resource websites!

Writing Prompt #75

Writing Prompt #75

Nervous

“Nervous?”
“Why would I be?”
“First time making a solo drop.  Kinda a big deal.”

Your final prompt for the week is a relatively open-ended one.  I think I actually based it on the same picture I based my “Desperately Needed” prompt.  However, this one has a slightly different tone behind it.  I can see the second of the two speakers being more confident.  It could all just be a front though.  What exactly is this unnamed individual dropping off and why is it a big deal?

If this prompt isn’t what you’re looking for today, take a look through my archive of writing prompts for inspiration.  Remember, everything you write belongs to you one hundred percent.  There’s no need to credit me at all.  However, if you use one of my prompts and want to share it with me, I’d love to see it.  You can post a link to your work below in the comments or send it to me via social media.

Want to show some appreciation for my prompts and articles in a monetary sense?  Consider donating to me for the price of a single hot beverage!  I’ll customize a prompt just for you!